CinebodyEvent Engagement Why the Game of Thrones Final Season Didn’t Have to Suck
game of thrones reaction

Why the Game of Thrones Final Season Didn’t Have to Suck

game of thrones reaction
The Fans Deserved Better

Why the Game of Thrones Final Season Didn’t Have to Suck
game of thrones reaction
The Fans Deserved Better

Why the Game of Thrones Final Season Didn’t Have to Suck
Well, everyone’s still talking about the train wreck also known as the Game of Thrones series finale, and the final season in general.

(Spoilers ahead if you’ve been unable to witness the downfall yet).

Sure, there were a few moments that didn’t stink, but overall season 8 started badly and quickly devolved into a chaotic, ill-conceived dumpster fire. This sums it up nicely.

Now, it’s no secret that showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, also known as D&D by fans, were done with the show and wanted to move on to Star Wars (although how they convinced HBO to do only six final episodes is more of a mystery).
game of thrones reaction
D&D ran into trouble after season 5, when the source material from George R. R. Martin started to dry up. The intricate plot lines George had so masterfully weaved began to unravel, and by the time we got to season 8 they were a complete mess. A mess that every fan knew could not be solved in six episodes, even if some were a little longer than usual.

What’s so frustrating is that these same fans have been there, building from season to season, offering advice, thoughts, plot suggestions, and character development arcs.

Did D&D ever reach out to them?

Did D&D ever think to talk to the fanbase and ask for guidance?

Well, that’s doubtful judging by the garbage final season and horrendous finale. But if they’d simply used an app like Cinebody to ask for feedback as far back as season 5, this could all have been a very different story.
Well, everyone’s still talking about the train wreck also known as the Game of Thrones series finale, and the final season in general.

(Spoilers ahead if you’ve been unable to witness the downfall yet).

Sure, there were a few moments that didn’t stink, but overall season 8 started badly and quickly devolved into a chaotic, ill-conceived dumpster fire. This sums it up nicely.
game of thrones reaction
Now, it’s no secret that showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, also known as D&D by fans, were done with the show and wanted to move on to Star Wars (although how they convinced HBO to do only six final episodes is more of a mystery).

D&D ran into trouble after season 5, when the source material from George R. R. Martin started to dry up. The intricate plot lines George had so masterfully weaved began to unravel, and by the time we got to season 8 they were a complete mess. A mess that every fan knew could not be solved in six episodes, even if some were a little longer than usual.
game of thrones reaction
game of thrones reaction
The Game of Thrones Fans Were an Untapped Expert Resource
It’s fair to say that D&D and the people working on the show are not as obsessed with Game of Thrones as its hardcore fans. These are the people who’ve read the books several times, watched episodes over and over, and even dress as their favorite characters.

They know what should be coming, and what shouldn’t happen.

By asking these fans a series of questions after each season, D&D could have had a much better picture of what fans were expecting, what they wanted to happen, and what they definitely didn’t want to happen.

Now that doesn’t mean D&D should have been asking questions like “how would you feel if Dany undid her entire character arc in the space of ten seconds, turned mad, set fire to thousands of women and kids, and then got stabbed by Jon?”

What they should have been asking is open-ended questions to draw from, like:

· What impact will Jon’s real heritage have on Dany’s mission?
· What is the Night King’s motivation? (We never did find out...thanks D&D)
· How will Jaime Lannister’s redemption story end?
· What could be more shocking than The Red Wedding?

Using the app, D&D could have also asked real-time follow up questions, creating an archive of valuable information and insights. This could be used to build episodes that were not only giving fans more of what they loved, but pulling huge shocks and surprises like the infamous Red Wedding episode, or the beheading of Ned Stark so early on.

It’s important to point out that it’s not about giving the fans what they ask for; it’s about giving them what they deserve. The same tactic could have been used to avoid the lame Seinfeld finale, or the atrocious final four seasons of Dexter.

With any luck, hopefully the showrunners of Westworld, Stranger Things, and Billions are reading this and taking note. After over 70 hours of time invested in Game of Thrones, fans deserved more. And they could have had it, if only the showrunners had asked them.

The Game of Thrones Fans Were an Untapped Expert Resource

It’s fair to say that D&D and the people working on the show are not as obsessed with Game of Thrones as its hardcore fans. These are the people who’ve read the books several times, watched episodes over and over, and even dress as their favorite characters.

They know what should be coming, and what shouldn’t happen.

By asking these fans a series of questions after each season, D&D could have had a much better picture of what fans were expecting, what they wanted to happen, and what they definitely didn’t want to happen.

Now that doesn’t mean D&D should have been asking questions like “how would you feel if Dany undid her entire character arc in the space of ten seconds, turned mad, set fire to thousands of women and kids, and then got stabbed by Jon?”
game of thrones reaction
What they should have been asking is open-ended questions to draw from, like:

· What impact will Jon’s real heritage have on Dany’s mission?

· What is the Night King’s motivation? (We never did find out...thanks D&D)

· How will Jaime Lannister’s redemption story end?

· What could be more shocking than The Red Wedding?

Using the Cinebody app, D&D could have also asked real-time follow up questions, creating an archive of valuable information and insights. This could be used to build episodes that were not only giving fans more of what they loved, but pulling huge shocks and surprises like the infamous Red Wedding episode, or the beheading of Ned Stark so early on.

It’s important to point out that it’s not about giving the fans what they ask for; it’s about giving them what they deserve. The same tactic could have been used to avoid the lame Seinfeld finale, or the atrocious final four seasons of Dexter.

With any luck, hopefully the showrunners of Westworld, Stranger Things, and Billions are reading this and taking note. After over 70 hours of time invested in Game of Thrones, fans deserved more. And they could have had it, if only the showrunners had asked them.