CinebodyFor social production Crowdsourcing A Music Video: Your Step-by-Step Guide

Crowdsourcing A Music Video: Your Step-by-Step Guide

Video Production

Want to Harness User-Generated Content From Your Fans?

Crowdsourcing
a Music Video: Your
Step-by-Step Guide

September 24, 2019
Video Production

Want to Harness User-Generated Content
From Your Fans?

Crowdsourcing a Music Video: Your Step-by-Step Guide

September 24, 2019
Are you looking to make a crowdsourced music video? Awesome! We’ve seen tons of different bands and brands leverage user-generated content to collaborate with fans and create something really special. So, we put this guide together to help you set up, execute and see success with your crowdsourced video campaign.
Are you looking to make a crowdsourced music video? Awesome! We’ve seen tons of different bands and brands leverage user-generated content to collaborate with fans and create something really special. So, we put this guide together to help you set up, execute and see success with your crowdsourced video campaign.
1. Set your vision
In most cases, there are two options for crowdsourced music videos:

· A 100% crowdsourced video
· A mix of crowdsourced footage and high-end cinematography

Being clear on your goal will help you work out what footage – and how much of it – you need from your fans.

Slash, for example, combined a lead cinematographer (A-roll) with his fans (B-roll) at his Hollywood Palladium show. This approach provided a really dynamic approach to the video, while also allowing him to have more control over the narrative and visual direction.

Without a cinematographer, you’ll want to garner more fan participation and a larger selection of shots. This was the approach the Dirty Heads took, creating a video packed with unique perspectives and different fans that soon went viral. Remember, every fan featured will go crazy for the video and is likely to share on their social channels!

Whichever option you choose, we recommend you keep things organized in a single Cinebody project. Other fans can then quickly see what’s been filmed, get excited and jump on the bandwagon themselves.
1. Set your vision
In most cases, there are two options for crowdsourced music videos:

· A 100% crowdsourced video
· A mix of crowdsourced footage and high-end cinematography

Being clear on your goal will help you work out what footage – and how much of it – you need from your fans.

Slash, for example, combined a lead cinematographer (A-roll) with his fans (B-roll) at his Hollywood Palladium show. This approach provided a really dynamic approach to the video, while also allowing him to have more control over the narrative and visual direction.

Without a cinematographer, you’ll want to garner more fan participation and a larger selection of shots. This was the approach the Dirty Heads took, creating a video packed with unique perspectives and different fans that soon went viral. Remember, every fan featured will go crazy for the video and is likely to share on their social channels!

Whichever option you choose, we recommend you keep things organized in a single Cinebody project. Other fans can then quickly see what’s been filmed, get excited and jump on the bandwagon themselves.
2. Develop a promotional strategy
How will you get your fans to take part? Most bands have die-hard fans, so with a bit of planning this shouldn’t be too difficult.

·If you’re touring
Play on the inherent sense of urgency that a tour schedule brings. Get fans at every stop to film around your chosen song. Use social media, Facebook event pages and ticket holder emails to spread the word. And make your requests extra engaging by designing flyers or promo videos to get people excited. Phrases like ‘Help Us’ or ‘Create With Us’ will quickly spark fans into action.

By the end, you’ll have likely gathered so much material, you might also be able to use some for tour recap and upcoming promo videos!

·If you’re not touring
Combine some coordinated social activity with an email blast to get the ball rolling. Produce a timeline to give your fans some deadlines to work towards, and use similar ‘Create With Us’ messages to appeal to their sense of community and loyalty.

Whether you’re touring or not, it’s important to try to build and maintain momentum. Don’t just post once on social media. Create multiple touch points and follow ups, then grow the excitement even more by offering VIP passes or another once-in-a-lifetime experience to really get your fans’ attention. In most cases, fans will film because they love your band. But a cool prize or incentive can turbocharge their efforts!
2. Develop a promotional strategy
How will you get your fans to take part? Most bands have die-hard fans, so with a bit of planning this shouldn’t be too difficult.

·If you’re touring
Play on the inherent sense of urgency that a tour schedule brings. Get fans at every stop to film around your chosen song. Use social media, Facebook event pages and ticket holder emails to spread the word. And make your requests extra engaging by designing flyers or promo videos to get people excited. Phrases like ‘Help Us’ or ‘Create With Us’ will quickly spark fans into action.

By the end, you’ll have likely gathered so much material, you might also be able to use some for tour recap and upcoming promo videos!

·If you’re not touring
Combine some coordinated social activity with an email blast to get the ball rolling. Produce a timeline to give your fans some deadlines to work towards, and use similar ‘Create With Us’ messages to appeal to their sense of community and loyalty.

Whether you’re touring or not, it’s important to try to build and maintain momentum. Don’t just post once on social media. Create multiple touch points and follow ups, then grow the excitement even more by offering VIP passes or another once-in-a-lifetime experience to really get your fans’ attention. In most cases, fans will film because they love your band. But a cool prize or incentive can turbocharge their efforts!
3. Direct and encourage
Providing guidance to your fans has two effects: you get the footage you need, and they get the encouragement to stay incredibly engaged. Using Cinebody’s push notifications is a great way to maintain momentum. And each little message is also building the long-term bond between you and your fans. So keep it up!
4. Edit and distribute
Once your bank of footage is large enough, it’s time to start producing the final film. As you go through the editing process, you may discover some shots are missing. But with an engaged band of fans already filming, it won’t be hard to send out a call for the material you need!

Once you’re done, you’ll have a great video for social. Remember to also publish it back through Cinebody. This means every fan who helped make your video a reality will be sure to see the finished product!
3. Direct and encourage
Providing guidance to your fans has two effects: you get the footage you need, and they get the encouragement to stay incredibly engaged. Using Cinebody’s push notifications is a great way to maintain momentum. And each little message is also building the long-term bond between you and your fans. So keep it up!
4. Edit and distribute
Once your bank of footage is large enough, it’s time to start producing the final film. As you go through the editing process, you may discover some shots are missing. But with an engaged band of fans already filming, it won’t be hard to send out a call for the material you need!

Once you’re done, you’ll have a great video for social. Remember to also publish it back through Cinebody. This means every fan who helped make your video a reality will be sure to see the finished product!